College of LAS « Illinois

Faculty Honors 2009

LAS professors bring honor and recognition to the college.

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December

Alejandro LugoAlejandro Lugo, associate professor and associate department head of anthropology, won the 2009 Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists Book Award, for his book Fragmented Lives, Assembled Parts: Culture, Capitalism, and Conquest at the U.S.-Mexico Border (University of Texas Press). Lugo’s book has also received a 2008 Southwest Book Award from the Border Regional Library Association.

Ralph MathisenThe Journal of Late Antiquity received an honorable mention for Best New Journal from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ). The CELJ announced its annual winners at the Modern Language Association conference in Philadelphia. The journal is edited by Ralph Mathisen, professor of history, and published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. The journal was first published in 2008 and is the first international English-language journal dedicated to the study of Late Antiquity.

Paul KenisMaimouna Barro, associate director for the Center for African Studies, received recognition for her book, The Role of Literacy in Enhancing Women’s Agency and Well Being, which is the main feature in the latest Women and Gender in Global Perspectives Program newsletter. She also published an article in the Special Climate Issue of the United Nations Chronicle.

Paul KenisPaul Kenis, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, was recognized by the Separations Division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers for his research focused on membrane protein crystallization on a chip. His research was recently was published in Crystal Growth & Design and published by Chemical & Engineering News.

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November

Alejandro LugoAlejandro Lugo, associate professor and associate department head of anthropology, received the Larine Y. Cowan “Make a Difference” award from the University’s Office of Equal Opportunity and Access. He was credited for “his advocacy to increase the number of underrepresented students at Illinois; his active participation in campus and community outreach for social justice; and to his efforts in addressing national issues about diversity.”

Richard MaselRichard Masel, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, has been awarded the Excellence in Process Development Research Award by the Process Development Division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. The award recognizes his work on formic acid fuel cells.

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October

Benita KatzenellenbogenBenita Katzenellenbogen, Swanlund Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology and Molecular and Integrative Physiology, has received the 2009 Susan G. Komen for the Cure Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in basic science and clinical research for her work investigating breast cancer treatments. Katzenellenbogen will be one of three honorees to deliver a keynote lecture at the 32nd annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, a major international gathering of breast cancer researchers, clinicians, and patient advocacy organizations. She will also receive a cash award of $25,000.

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September

John RogersJohn Rogers, the Lee J. Flory-Founder Chair in Engineering Innovation, founding professor of materials science and engineering, and professor of chemistry, is a recipient of the MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Award. Rogers will receive $500,000 in "no strings attached" support over the next five years.

Janice HarringtonJanice Harrington, assistant professor of English, received the 2009 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award. The award is given to women writers of exceptional talent who are in the early stages of their careers. The award brings with it a $25,000 prize, which Harrington will use to finish a collection of poems, Night Shift, based on her experience as a student working summers and weekends on the night shift as a nurse’s aide in a county nursing home. Her nominator says of her work, “Despite the difficulty of the lives she writes about, Harrington is a poet full of joy, delight, and faith in the world. This rather unfamiliar ‘upbeat’ message is masterfully integrated into the poems and only adds to their resonance and staying power.”

Gene E. RobinsonGene E. Robinson, Swanlund Chair and professor of entomology, was elected as a 2009 Fellow to the Entomological Society of America (ESA). He was cited for his integrative research of social behavior, using the honeybee, and for pioneering the field of sociogenomics. The election as a Fellow acknowledges outstanding contributions in research, teaching, extension, or administration. The Fellows will be recognized at the 2009 ESA annual meeting in December. Additionally, Robinson received the National Institutes of Health Pioneer Award. Pioneer Awards are designed to support individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose pioneering—and possibly transforming approaches—to major challenges in biomedical and behavioral research. He is using his Pioneer Award to understand in molecular terms how to transform the brain’s reward system from a selfish to an altruistic orientation. The goal is to achieve new insights into the flexibility of reward circuits that will fundamentally change our understanding of drug addiction and other diseases of the reward system.

Carla D. Hunter Carla D. Hunter, assistant professor of psychology, received the American Psychological Association’s 2009 Section on Ethnic and Racial Diversity Outstanding Contribution to Scholarship on Race and Ethnicity Award.

John A. Gerlt John A. Gerlt, Gutgsell chair and professor of biochemistry, chemistry and biophysics, and basic medical sciences, received the 2010 Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award from the American Chemical Society. The award recognizes and encourages excellence in organic chemistry. The award consists of a cash prize, a certificate, and a $40,000 unrestricted research grant to be assigned by the recipient to any university or nonprofit institution.

Maria Spies Maria Spies, assistant professor of biochemistry and biophysics, received the Margaret Oakley Dayhoff Award from the Biophysical Society. She was selected for "her exemplary research into the mechanisms of DNA repair and the cell cycle maintenance machinery." The award is given to a woman who holds very high promise or has achieved prominence while developing the early stages of a career in biophysical research. Achievement means that the candidate has already published substantial contributions to science; promise means that the candidate shows indications of leadership in ideas, organization, or other ways manifest for her colleagues within the scientific community. This award is presented each year at the annual meeting of the Biophysical Society, and consists of a monetary award.

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August

Ezekiel KalipeniEzekiel Kalipeni, professor of geography, will serve as a program officer for the Geography and Spatial Sciences Program at the National Science Foundation for two years, during which time he will retain his appointment in the Department of Geography. In his position, he will learn the inner-workings of proposal processing and the awarding of grants at the primary U.S. funding agency for scientific research.

Dolores Albarracin Dolores Albarracin, professor of psychology, was named a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. Fellow status is awarded to members who have made sustained outstanding contributions to the science of psychology in the areas of research, teaching, and/or application. She was also named a Fellow of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

Glenn I. Roisman Glenn I. Roisman, associate professor of psychology, received the Boyd R. McCandless Young Scientist Award from the American Psychology Association (APA). The Boyd McCandless Award recognizes a young scientist who has made a distinguished theoretical contribution to developmental psychology, has conducted programmatic research of distinction, or has made a distinguished contribution to the dissemination of developmental science. The award is presented by the membership of Division 7 of the APA, and the award winner will be invited to address the following year's meeting of the APA.

Scott E. Denmark Scott E. Denmark, Reynold C. Fuson Professor of Chemistry, was elected as a Fellow to the American Chemical Society. The distinction of Fellow "recognize[s] members of the American Chemical Society for outstanding achievements in and contributions to Science, the Profession, and the Society." The distinguished honor of a Fellows designation will go to those who have distinguished themselves in multiple areas, including promoting the science, the profession, and service to the American Chemical Society.

Deborah E. Leckband Deborah E. Leckband, Reid T. Milner Professor of Chemistry, was elected as a Fellow to the American Chemical Society. The distinction of Fellow "recognize[s] members of the American Chemical Society for outstanding achievements in and contributions to Science, the Profession, and the Society." The distinguished honor of a Fellows designation will go to those who have distinguished themselves in multiple areas, including promoting the science, the profession, and service to the American Chemical Society.

Thomas B. Rauchfuss Thomas B. Rauchfuss, William H. and Janet G. Lycan Professor of Chemistry, was elected as a Fellow to the American Chemical Society. The distinction of Fellow "recognize[s] members of the American Chemical Society for outstanding achievements in and contributions to Science, the Profession, and the Society." The distinguished honor of a Fellows designation will go to those who have distinguished themselves in multiple areas, including promoting the science, the profession, and service to the American Chemical Society.

Steven C. Zimmerman Steven C. Zimmerman, head and Roger Adams Professor of Chemistry, was elected as a Fellow to the American Chemical Society. The distinction of Fellow "recognize[s] members of the American Chemical Society for outstanding achievements in and contributions to Science, the Profession, and the Society." The distinguished honor of a Fellows designation will go to those who have distinguished themselves in multiple areas, including promoting the science, the profession, and service to the American Chemical Society.

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July

Martin BurkeMartin Burke, professor of chemistry, will receive the 2009 AstraZeneca Excellence in Chemistry Award, presented to academic researchers who have demonstrated distinct potential in synthetic, mechanistic, or bio-organic chemistry. Receipients receive $50,000 unrestricted research grants.

Neil Kelleher Neil Kelleher, professor of chemistry, received the 2009 Biemann Medal and a cash award from the American Society for Mass Spectrometry at the society's annual conference. The award recognizes a significant acheivement in basic or applied mass spectrometry made by an individual early in his or her career.

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June

Hans Henrich HockHans Henrich Hock, professor emeritus of linguistics and Sanskrit, has been invited to be a fellow in the Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Advanced Studies of Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. He will work on a publication project on language contact in South Asia and offer a short course in the Centre for Linguistics.

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May

Martin BurkeMartin Burke, professor of chemistry, was awarded a 2009 Amgen Young Investigator's Award, which includes an unrestricted grant of $25,000 and the opportunity to present a lecture at an Amgen symposium in October. The award recognizes young chemists who are making significant contributions to the field of organic chemistry and pharmaceutical research.

Chad RienstraChad Rienstra, professor of chemistry, received the Founders Medal from the International Conferences on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems. The award cited Rienstra's innovative work in the area of solid-state NMR methodology and applications to determine protein structures. The award is given to a scientist under age 41 who has made exceptional contributions to developments and/or progress in the area of magnetic resonance in biological systems.

Ken SuslickKen Suslick, professor of chemistry, received the 2009 Student Council Mentoring Award from the Acoustical Society of America. The council presents this award every 18 months to recognize exemplary mentors who guide the academic and/or professional growth of students and junior colleagues.

Andrzej WieckowskiAndrzej Wieckowski, professor of chemistry, has been appointed a fellow of the International Society of Electrochemistry. A member is named a fellow "in recognition of her/his continuing outstanding scientific and/or technical achievement within the field of electrochemistry." Fellows will be inducted in August at the annual meeting in Beijing.

Mark Leff, associate professor of history, Bruce Reznick, professor of mathematics, Katherine Wahl, teaching associate of mathematics, and John Griswold, lecturer of English, have been honored with the Campus Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. The award recognizes professors, instructional staff members, and graduate teaching assistants who display consistently excellent performance in the classroom, take innovative approaches to teaching, positively affect the lives of their students, and make other contributions to improved instruction, including influencing the curriculum.

Philippe TondeurPhilippe Tondeur, professor of mathematics (emeritus), was named a Fellow by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). Fellowship is an honorific designation conferred on members distinguished for their outstanding contributions to the fields of applied mathematics and computational science. He was cited for leadership in science policy.

Donald BurkholderDonald Burkholder, professor of mathematics (emeritus), was named a Fellow by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). Fellowship is an honorific designation conferred on members distinguished for their outstanding contributions to the fields of applied mathematics and computational science. He was cited for his advances in martingale transforms and applications of probabilistic methods in analysis.

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April

Valerie HoffmanValerie Hoffman, associate professor of religious studies, was selected as a 2009 Carnegie Scholar. The Carnegie Scholars Program seeks to promote American understanding of Islam as a religion and the characteristics of Muslim societies, particularly American Muslim communities. The title of Hoffman’s project is “Islamic Sectarianism Reconsidered: Ibadi Islam in the Modern Age.” Her exploration of Ibadism’s responses to globalization will shed light on the potential for a rigid, closed sect to embrace the diversity of the global age. The resulting book will fill a significant gap in the field and enhance both academic and public understanding of the distinctive nature of modern Ibadism.

Paul KwiatPaul Kwiat, Bardeen professor of physics and electrical and computer engineering, is among the 360 Outstanding Referees of the Physical Review and Physical Review Letters journals by the American Physical Society, chosen by the journal editors for 2009. The program recognizes scientists who have been helpful in assessing manuscripts for publication in the society's journals.

Michael StoneMichael Stone, professor of physics, is among the 360 Outstanding Referees of the Physical Review and Physical Review Letters journals by the American Physical Society, chosen by the journal editors for 2009. The program recognizes scientists who have been helpful in assessing manuscripts for publication in the society's journals.

Alejandro LugoAlejandro Lugo, associate professor of anthropology and Latina/o studies, received a 2008 Southwest Book award from the Border Regional Library Association for his book Fragmented Lives, Assembled Parts: Culture, Capitalism, and Conquest at the U.S.-Mexico Border. The award is presented in recognition of outstanding books about the Southwest published in any genre and directed toward any audience.

Kenneth SuslickKenneth Suslick, Marvin T. Schmidt professor of chemistry and professor of materials science and engineering, was recognized as an MRS Fellow by the Materials Research Society. Fellowship is awarded to one whose sustained and distinguished contributions to the advancement of materials research are internationally recognized.

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March

Michael Palencia-RothMichael Palencia-Roth, Trowbridge Scholar in Literary Studies and professor of comparative and world literature, has been appointed to a multi-year term as senior adviser to the Institute of Moralogy, Reitaku University, Japan. He is the third senior adviser and the first international one in the history of the institute.

Jabari AsimJabari Asim, scholar-in-residence in African American studies and journalism, received the 2009 AABHE Distinguished Cultural Award from the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education. This award is given to those individuals whose body of work has documented the black American experience.

Danuta ShanzerDanuta Shanzer, professor of classics and medieval studies, was elected as a Fellow of the Medieval Academy. Fellows are scholars who have made notable contributions to the furthering of the stated purpose of the academy, which is to support the research, publication, and teaching of all aspects of the Middle Ages.

Nicholas YannelisNicholas Yannelis, Commerce Distinguished Alumni professor of economics, has become the editor of Economic Theory. Economic Theory provides an outlet for research in all areas of economics based on rigorous theoretical reasoning and on topics in mathematics that are supported by the analysis of economic problems.

Anna Westerstahl StenportAnna Westerstahl Stenport, assistant professor of Germanic languages and literatures, Scandinavian studies, cinema studies, comparative and world literature, and gender and women's studies, has been awarded a fellowship for postdoctoral research in Scandinavian studies by the Scandinavian American Foundation. The award is for her book project concerning new models of cinema production at the Swedish Film Institute and Film i Väst. The award carries a travel and research stipend for research on contemporary Swedish film and the Scandinavian film industry.

Harry Triandis, professor of psychology (emeritus), has won the Eminent Scholar Award in International Management from the Academy of Management. The award is "aimed at recognizing a body of scholarship that has profound impact on international management and business scholarship, research, and practice. The recipient is meant to embody a mixture of new thought and effective communication into the community." He will give a talk and receive the award at the Academy of Management conference in Chicago on August 11.

Frederick HoxieFrederick Hoxie, Swanlund professor of history, has been named a professor in the Center for Advanced Study (CAS). CAS professors are permanent members of the center, selected from the faculty on the basis of their outstanding scholarship. These appointments are among the highest forms of campus recognition.

Scott DenmarkScott Denmark, R.C. Fuson Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded the Herbert C. Brown Award for creative research in synthetic methods from the American Chemical Society. Denmark’s most seminal contribution is laying the theoretical foundation and exploiting the manifestations of Lewis base activation of Lewis acids, a counterintuitive phenomenon.

Ziada (Zan) Luthey-SchultenZiada (Zan) Luthey-Schulten, professor of chemistry, was named a William H. and Janet G. Lycan professor of chemistry. This professorship is awarded to exceptional faculty in the School of Chemical Sciences.

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February

Benjamin McCallBenjamin McCall, assistant professor of chemistry and astronomy, received a 2009 Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The Sloan Research Fellowships seek to stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise. These two-year fellowships are awarded yearly to researchers in recognition of distinguished performance and a unique potential to make substantial contributions to their field.

Martin BurkeMartin Burke, assistant professor of chemistry, received a 2009 Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The Sloan Research Fellowships seek to stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise. These two-year fellowships are awarded yearly to researchers in recognition of distinguished performance and a unique potential to make substantial contributions to their field.

Ed DienerEd Diener, Alumni Distinguished Professor of Psychology (emeritus), was a recipient of the 2008 American Publishers Award for Professional and Scholarly Excellence (PROSE) for prose work in the field of psychology, for his recent book Happiness: Unlocking the Mysteries of Psychological Wealth.

Clarence LangClarence Lang, associate professor of African American studies and history, received the 2009 EBSCOhost America: History and Life Award for his article “The ‘Long Movement’ as Vampire: Temporal and Spatial Fallacies in Recent Black Freedom Studies,” which he coauthored with Professor Sundiata Cha-Jua. The EBSCOhost America: History and Life Award is a biennial award given to recognize and encourage scholarship in American history in the journal literature advancing new perspectives on accepted interpretations or previously unconsidered topics.

Sundiata Cha-JuaSundiata Cha-Jua, associate professor of African American studies and history, received the 2009 EBSCOhost America: History and Life Award for his article “The ‘Long Movement’ as Vampire: Temporal and Spatial Fallacies in Recent Black Freedom Studies,” which he coauthored with Professor Clarence Lang. The EBSCOhost America: History and Life Award is a biennial award given to recognize and encourage scholarship in American history in the journal literature advancing new perspectives on accepted interpretations or previously unconsidered topics.

Carl WoeseCarl Woese, the Stanley O. Ikenberry Professor of Microbiology, will be honored by the 2009 American Society for Microbiology with the Abbott-ASM Lifetime Achievement Award this May. This is the society’s premier award for sustained, remarkable contributions to the microbiological sciences.

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January

Elizabeth LoweElizabeth Lowe, director of the Center for Translation Studies, was recognized on the list of "Outstanding Academic Titles" for 2008 by Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries. She was recognized for her work "Translation and the Rise of Inter-American Literature" (University Press of Florida, 2007). Titles are chosen based on their overall excellence in presentation and scholarship, importance relative to other literature in the filed, and distinction as a first treatment of a subject.

Christopher FennellChristopher Fennell, assistant professor of anthropology, working with other archaeologists, historians, and volunteers, has succeeded in having New Philadelphia, Ill., recognized as a National Historic Landmark. New Philadelphia was the first town established by a free African American before the Civil War. New Philadelphia was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005, nominated for National Historic Landmark status in 2008, and received National Historic Landmark status on January 16, 2009.

Wilfred van der DonkWilfred van der Donk, Richard E. Heckert endowed chair in chemistry, received the 2009 OBC Lecture Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry's journal Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry in recognition of his contribution to the field of bioorganic chemistry, particularly related to lantibiotics and molecular processes associated with resistance to antiobiotics and bacterial infections. The award is given to chemists who have made a significant research contribution to organic or bioorganic chemistry. The lecture will be given as part of the Natural Products symposium at the 42nd IUPAC congress, to be held in Glasgow, Scotland, August 2-7.

Jay BassJay Bass, professor of geology, was elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. Only one in each 1,000 members is elected to the Fellowship each year. Nominations for this honor are reserved for those who have made exceptional scientific contributions and who have attained acknowledged eminence in Earth and space science. The Fellowships will be awarded at an Honors Ceremony this May.

Don WuebblesDon Wuebbles, professor of atmospheric sciences, was elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. Only one in each 1,000 members is elected to the Fellowship each year. Nominations for this honor are reserved for those who have made exceptional scientific contributions and who have attained acknowledged eminence in Earth and space science. The Fellowships will be awarded at an Honors Ceremony this May.

Abigail A. SalyersAbigail A. Salyers, professor of microbiology, will be awarded the American Society for Microbiology’s 2009 Graduate Microbiology Teaching Award. This award recognizes distinguished teaching of microbiology and mentoring of students at the graduate and postgraduate levels. The award will be presented during the society’s 109th general meeting in May. The society is the world’s oldest and largest life science organization and has more than 43,000 members worldwide.

Mara R. Wade Mara R. Wade, professor of Germanic languages and literatures, was elected the chair of the International Society for Emblem Studies. The society exists to foster the study of emblem books and related materials in literature and the visual arts, their origins and influence on other cultural forms, in all periods, countries, and languages.

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